Concluso il €œGlobal Poverty Summit€ a Johannesburg

Cerca nel portale

Regioni

Regione Valle D'Aosta Regione  Piemonte Regione Lombardia Regione  Trentino Alto Adige Regione Veneto Regione  Liguria Regione Emilia Romagna Regione Toscana Regione Umbria Regione Marche Regione Lazio Regione  Abruzzo Regione  Basilicata Regione Campania Regione Molise Regione Puglia Regione Calabria Regione Sicilia Regione Friuli Venezia Giulia Regione Sardegna

AREA SOCI

Concluso il €œGlobal Poverty Summit€ a Johannesburg

Attenzione: apre in una nuova finestra. StampaEmail

Fonte: CooperazionealloSviluppo.Esteri.it

Il Global Poverty Summit si è concluso a Johannesburg con la dichiarazione che le regole commerciali non possono essere applicate dai Paesi ricchi anche se i Paesi poveri non le condividono. Secondo la dichiarazione del summit ci dovrebbero essere «Differenziali seri, importanti e significativi e dei dispositivi complementari alle differenti fasi di sviluppo» e per lottare davvero contro la povertà  «Il mondo ha bisogno di accelerare i progressi degli Obiettivi del Millennio per lo sviluppo (Dmg)». Ma la dichiarazione finale del Global Poverty Summit sottolinea che per far questo «Le politiche hanno bisogno di essere riformate», ad iniziare da quelle del commercio internazionale e che «Questa azione coraggiosa è giustificata dal divario sempre pi๠crescente tra i ricchi ed i poveri».

Cinquanta tra i migliori cervelli del mondo riuniti a Johannesburg hanno discusso del ruolo delle istituzioni globali nella riduzione della povertà  e dei perché oltre un miliardo di persone, circa un quinto della popolazione mondiale, vivano in assoluta povertà , nonostante abitino ancora in un mondo con abbastanza risorse e cibo e con nuove conoscenze e tecnologie.

Joseph Stiglitz, premio Nobel per l'economia e presidente del Brooks world poverty institute, ha detto nel suo intervento al summit che «Il commercio internazionale non aiuterà  a combattere la povertà  se i Paesi ricchi non trasformano la loro retorica in azione. Per riuscire a farlo, c'è bisogno di coraggio e di sacrifici da parte dei Paesi ricchi. Le nazioni ricche devono accettare che ci sarà  un prezzo da pagare per il cambiamento. Questo cambiamento significa €cambiare le carte in tavola€, in una certa misura, degli attuali commerci nel mondo».

Secondo i delegati «I governi devono essere protagonisti dell'economia globale, e non rimanere ai margini in un mondo fatto di mercati senza limiti». Rorden Wilkinson, direttore per la ricerca del Brooks World Poverty Institute ha ricordato un'ovvietà  seppellita nel dimenticatoio degli anni dell'iperliberismo rampante e della finanziarizzazione dell'economia: «Nessun Paese industriale sarebbe arrivato dove è oggi senza un significativo intervento dello Stato. Il tema scottante della sicurezza alimentare sottolinea il caso della necessità  dell'intervento dello Stato». Per questo la dichiarazione del summit dice che «Gli Stati hanno il diritto di attuare misure di lotta contro la volatilità  dei prezzi dei generi alimentari e che dovrebbero essere adottate regole globali per impedire speculazioni e ingiustizie in questo settore».